To be human, at the most profound level, is to encounter honestly the inescapable circumstances that constrain us, yet muster the courage to struggle compassionately for our own unique individualities and for more democratic and free societies.
-- Cornel West

Media

Media:

In February 2014, Pat Dillon wrote a feature article for Isthmus about Caliph Muab-El's social justice work following his release from prison after more than decade of incarceration. Both Muab-El, then known as Tony, and his brother Jeremiah, also mentioned in the article, were active participants in Writers in Prisons Projects classes while at Oakhill.

In August 2013, Al Ross, the host of Spectrum West, a Wisconsin Public Radio program, invited Steel Wagstaff on his show to speak about the Writers in Prisons Project. You can listen to a 11 minute clip from that show below:

In February 2013, Oakhill administrators granted permission for the Monday evening poetry class to organize and record a reading of work by participants in that class at Oakhill. That recording aired on WSUM (91.7FM), a local student radio station in April 2013. You can listen to the hour-long recording of that event below:

In April 2012, the Cap Times published a short feature article about the Thursday evening Russian lit class led by several graduate students from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature.

In 2011, instructors from the Writers in Prisons Project poetry class held a reading and informational event as part of the Wisconsin Book Festival. The event was attended by more than 50 community members, one of whom was the host of a student radio show on WSUM. Following that event, Steel Wagstaff, one of the instructors in the poetry class, was invited to appear on WSUM to discuss the Writers in Prison Project. You can listen to segments from their conversation below:

In September 2010, Madison Magazine published a brief feature article on Laurel and the work being done by the Writers in Prisons Project.

In May 2007, the Madison-based publication Isthmus printed a feature story on the HEX-grant sponsored creative writing workshop led by Ray Hsu and Marianne Erhardt that was the seed for what would later become the Writers in Prisons Project.